FAQ

Q: How can I determine if I have hearing loss?

A: Some of the most common first signs of hearing loss include: having to often ask people to repeat themselves, listening to audio at higher volumes than previously, and having difficulty understanding conversations when there is background noise. All of these point to hearing loss. However, the only way to truly know the facts about your hearing health is to schedule a hearing screening. At Audiology and Vestibular Center, we can provide you with a free hearing screening to determine if you have any form of hearing loss, and if so, the next steps to make in order to take control of your hearing health.

Q: I believe someone in my family has hearing loss but refuses to acknowledge it. How can I help?

A: Starting to confront hearing loss can be the most difficult step for someone. Support from family and friends can be often be the factor that starts someone on their path to improved hearing. By educating yourself about hearing loss and offering to accompany them to their hearing screening, you can relieve some of their worries and help them ease into the transition.

Q: How much do hearing aids cost?

A: There are many factors that determine the price of a hearing instrument, including the severity of hearing loss, what types of features are included in the hearing device, and the style of the hearing device. We offer a large range of options to our patients, so there are hearing solutions for every lifestyle and budget.

Q: How long do hearing aid batteries last?

A: The average lifespan of a battery is about a week. However, with proper care and taking steps, such as opening the battery door on your device when not in use, you can greatly increase your battery's life.

Q: Are hearing aids the same as they were for my grandparent or parent?

A: No, hearing aids have come a long way in the past ten years. All modern hearing aids offer background noise reduction that far surpasses old hearing aid models. They're also able to be programmed specifically to your individual hearing loss, leading to better hearing results. And other frustrations, such as squealing from feedback, are no longer a concern.

Myths & Facts

Myth: Everyone will notice and stare at my hearing aids.

Fact: Hearing devices are no longer large bulky devices. They have become sleek and discreet pieces of technology. Most often, people around you will never even notice you are wearing a hearing device.

Myth: My hearing loss has not reached a level that requires a hearing device.

Fact: Hearing loss is not something that should be left untreated because untreated hearing loss has been connected with other conditions such as cognitive decline and frequent slips and falls. Hearing devices are now available to treat almost all forms and severity of hearing loss. The sooner you are able to confront your hearing loss, the easier it will be to transition into wearing hearing devices.

Myth: Once I have having hearing aids, I don’t need to return to the audiologist.

Fact: Being fitted with hearing devices isn’t the end of your hearing health journey. It’s important to schedule annual hearing screenings and routine device cleanings and maintenance so that you can continue to get the best results from your hearing aids.

Myth: All I need is one hearing device.

Fact: There are cases where a person may only need one hearing device, but most commonly hearing loss is present in both ears. With wearing devices in both ears, you will find that you get better clarity and better sense of the direction and distance of sounds.

Myth: Hearing aids will fix my hearing loss.

Fact: Unfortunately, there is no cure for hearing loss. Hearing aids will not be a perfect substitute for your original hearing. However, if you have realistic expectations, you'll be astonished by how much you've been missing and how much you can now enjoy with the help of hearing aids.

Hearing Loss Comorbidities

Hearing loss can co-occur with other health problems, and some health problems can even be caused by untreated hearing loss, or vice versa:

  • Dementia risk may be 5 times higher for those with untreated hearing loss.
  • Hearing loss is twice as likely for those with diabetes.
  • Those with hearing loss have a 3-fold increased risk of falling.
  • There is a known correlation between hearing los and cardiovascular disease.

Treating your hearing loss can increase your quality of life and help other conditions improve.

  • Hearing aid use has been shown to improve memory recall.
  • Hearing aid use is linked to decreased depression symptoms and increased quality of life.


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© 2019 Kendall Audiology
Miami Hearing Aids Expert Kendall Audiology
9150 SW 87th Ave #103
Miami, FL 33176

(305) 595-1530
Open M-F: 9:00am - 5:00pm

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